Nottinghamshire Glow Worms 2022
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The Glow Worm is without doubt, one of our most fascinating insects. Famous for the ability to produce its own light, the green bioluminescence emitted by the female Glow Worm has formed the basis of countless fairy tales and folklore over centuries.

Despite still regarded by some authorities as being both nationally and locally common, this delightful beetle has been proved to be in serious decline.

The data collected by a number of local recorders over the past ten years, has helped confirm both decline and demise in Nottinghamshire's Glow Worm populations. However, getting people to sit up and take notice has proved to be rather difficult and it doesn't help when those very same authorities continue to denounce any existance of decline. 

Habitat loss through urbanisation and industrial development, the use of pesticides and herbicides in modern farming practices and the increase in light pollution, are all thought to have contributed to the Glow Worm's decline.

 
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But Nottinghamshire is fortunate in having one of the UK's largest and most famous Glow Worm colonies in the shape of Clipstone Old Quarter. For many years, Clipstone Old Quarter (located deep within the heart of Sherwood Forest) was synonymous for producing the UK's earliest larvae and females and with the 2022 glowing season only a few months away, there is much to look forward to.
 

Help monitor Glow Worm distribution - contribute your records

Members of the public can contribute to the Nottinghamshire Glow Worm Survey and we welcome any Glow Worm records from within VC56 Nottinghamshire. The easiest way to contribute your records, is by completing the simple online survey form on the right.

The form can also be used to send in any old Glow Worm records you may have, as old records are important in helping to determine a more accurate picture of Glow Worm distribution and how it has changed over time. And it is just as useful if we know where Glow Worms are not found, so please remember that negative results from a site are equally as important as positive results and will help our mapping of the Glow Worm's distribution.

Useful Glow Worm links on www.eakringbirds.com

 
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Nottinghamshire Glow Worm records 2022

Contributors to the Nottinghamshire Glow Worm Survey 2022:

Thanks to the following people who have sent in their survey results:
 
Surveyed   Site name   Grid ref   Site type/habitat   Qty   Notes   Recorder
March 00th   Clipstone Old Quarter   SK608674   Former Pine plantation and grass/scrub strip   0   No larvae recorded   TP.
........................... . .................................................... . . . ............................................. . . . .......................................................................................... . ..........................

 

Larval survey data 2022

The latest Clipstone Old Quarter larval survey data, will appear here from March onwards if conditions are suitable for larvae to appear.
 
Fig 01. ... Glow Worm larval size ranges found at Clipstone Old Quarter during March 2022  Data correct as of 01/03/22
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    9mm-15mm larval size range   Intermediate   19mm-28mm larval size range
Section   9mm 10mm 11mm 12mm 13mm 14mm 15mm   16mm 17mm 18mm   19mm 20mm 21mm 22mm 23mm 24mm 25mm 26mm 27mm 28mm
A .. 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 .. 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
B .. 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 .. 1 0 2 .. 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
C .. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 .. 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
D .. 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 .. 0 1 3 .. 2 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
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    9mm-15mm larval size range 00.00%   Intermediate 00.00%   19mm-28mm larval size range 00.00%
Total % .. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 ... 0.00 0.00 0.00 ... 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
 
Larval survey data 2009-2022

Data gained from larval surveys during March, April and May in most years, showed a decrease in the average length of Glow Worm larva at Clipstone Old Quarter over that time.
We found that the average larval size from Spring 2009 to 2014 was 20.32mm, based on the data gathered from a total of 771 larvae.

It also showed that larvae were considerably larger on average in 2009 (22.21mm) than in any of the following years, equating to 1.89mm larger than the average produced between 2010 and 2015. This has continued to be the case and the average length of larvae in 2016 was found to be just 17.99mm, showing a decrease of  4.22mm.

The data in the table provided in Fig 02 below, is presented as (for example) 17.00mm/tL6. An explanation of this would be 17.00mm (the average larval length) / tL6 (taken from a total of six larvae) but this obviously changes daily after each survey. The Spring average follows the same principle, but the average is obviously taken from the total larvae found that particular Spring.
 
Fig 03. ... Glow Worm larval averages during Spring 2009-2022  Data correct as of 01/01/22  
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Week/period . 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2020 2021 2021
March 22-31 . ..... ..... 18.03mm/tL27 21.16mm/tL6. ..... 17.90mm/tL13 .   18.44mm/tL90 17.63mm/tL28 00.00mm/tL00
April 1-7 . 23.33mm/tL3. 21.27mm/tL13 18.64mm/tL70 19.00mm/tL5. .... 18.65mm/tL24 18.16mm/tL6.   16.46mm/tL13 19.75mm/tL4  
April 8-14 . 21.14mm/tL14 19.58mm/tL17 19.19mm/tL31 19.66mm/tL9. 17.11mm/tL9. 18.27mm/tL59 19.11mm/tL16 15.00mm/tL3      
April 15-21 . 20.45mm/tL10 20.78mm/tL18 19.78mm/tL53 23.20mm/tL5. 18.34mm/tL34 18.62mm/tL22 20.66mm/tL8.   18.26mm/tL20 18.00mm/tL1  
April 22-29 . 23.32mm/tL25 18.74mm/tL53 19.97mm/tL39 18.77mm/tL9. 18.61mm/tL25 20.20mm/tL36 .   18.83mm/tL6* 21.66mm/tL3  
April 30-May 6   22.95mm/tL20 23.20mm/tL5. 21.87mm/tL8. 20.95mm/tL22 19.85mm/tL16 21.87mm/tL21 . 17.66mm/tL15 . 19.75mm/tL4  
May 7-14 . 22.08mm/tL17 23.25mm/tL4. ..... 22.30mm/tL10 21.62mm/tL21 21.25mm/tL4. . 18.22mm/tL22 19.75mm/tL4  
May 15-22 . . 19.66mm/tL60 . . 21.71mmtL/8 . . 19.97mm/tL34
May 23-30 . . . . . . . . 19.11mm/tL90      
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Spring avg   22.21mm/tL89 20.92mm/tL116 19.58mm/tL228 20.45mm/tL66 19.52mm/tL103 19.53mm/tL169 N/A 17.99mm/tL83 N/A N/A  
 

The size data produced since 2010 has been remarkably consistant where sufficient data was collected, showing a variation of just 1.40mm. 2021 data is not included in this. Breaking the data down further, the average size variation in three of the years since (2011, 2013 and 2014) showed variation as little as 0.06mm. If we exclude the 2009 size data on the basis of being unusually large, then an average larval size at this site would be approximately 20.00mm. The relative consistant larval sizes suggests that variations in rainfall and temperature between November and March in any year, actually had no influence on larval size.

 
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