Hornet Vespa crabro (Linnaeus, 1798)
Wasps are social insects and well known to everyone. Colonies build up during the Summer and can eventually total several thousand by the time the colony dies at the onset of cold weather. Only the young queens survive the Winter, hibernating in sheds and hollow trees etc, to start new colonies in the Spring. By any standards, the Hornet is one of our most impressive and imposing insects. Workers have a length of nearly 3.5cm, which means it is by far the largest species of wasp found in the UK. It is also quite uncommon, but has increased it's range during recent years following a succession of mild Winters. The south-east UK is still perhaps it's real stronghold, but it can now be encountered just about anywhere in Nottinghamshire, although the Dukeries and Sherwood Forest area is perhaps the most likely place to see it. Nests are usually found within dead or decaying trees.
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Nottinghamshire (VC56) distribution of Vespa crabro
 
 
 
 
The records for the Nottinghamshire distribution map are currently provided by the following contributors - Trevor and Dilys Pendleton. Richard Rogers. Pauline Bradford. Andy Godfrey (2006 Sherwood Heath SSSI invertebrate survey). Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust. Wil Heeney. Tim Sexton. Darren Matthews. Sean Tobin. Trevor and Dilys Pendleton (Sherwood Forest Invertebrate Directory 2014). Stuart Warrington. The National Trust (Clumber Park invertebrate records). Damian Taylor. Rob Johnson. NBGRC. Peter Acton. Paul and Helen Brock. John and Denise Bingham.

You can contribute your own records to help us gain an accurate status of this species in Nottinghamshire. Send an Excel spreadsheet of your records via the 'contact us' link at the top of the homepage.

Updated April 2019

copyright Trevor and Dilys Pendleton (www.eakringbirds.com) . .
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